MOZA R3 Racing Bundle Review


After the set officially launched at the OverTake office, it was time for a MOZA R3 Racing Bundle review – here are our thoughts on the entry-level direct drive kit!

Last week we showed you our first impressions and an unboxing of the MOZA R3 Racing Bundle for Xbox and PC. In the meantime, we have tested it extensively on both platforms and can hopefully answer many of your questions in our review, including the fact that it unfortunately does not work with one of the most relevant racing simulations currently available on Xbox. Let's take a closer look at it and find out who this kit is for and who might want to consider something else.

MOZA R3 Racing Bundle Contents​

For those of you who have not watched our video last week, here is a summary of the key information: The R3 Racing Bundle includes a compact wheelbase in an X-design that features a direct drive servo motor with 3.9 Nm of peak torque.

There is also a 280 mm (11 inch) diameter wheel with 22 buttons, shift pedals and typical Xbox assignments, called the ESX wheel. With the PU material on the alloy, it is not a marvel of material appearance, but it is cleanly finished. There is even an LED strip, which only serves a limited purpose, but more about that later.

ESX Wheel.png

The Xbox buttons on the ESX Wheel.

The package is rounded off by the SRP-Lite pedals. These are equipped with maintenance-free, easy-to-actuate Hall sensors. The pedals’ sturdy steel construction is also much more stable than the plastic pedals found in most other entry-level sets. An important note: The table clamp is also included as standard.

Price​

The bundle costs €439 in the EU and just under $400 in the US without taxes. With this competitive price, the MOZA R3 is positioned close to the gear and belt-driven wheels like the Logitech G923 or Thrustmaster TMX/TX, and is even slightly cheaper than the currently lowest-priced Xbox compatible 5 Nm Direct Drive Ready2Race bundle from Fanatec.

For €40 more you get an additional 1.1 Nm of peak torque there, although it has the old Fanatec QR1 quick release, which the MOZA QR is superior to. With the licensed McLaren or WRC rims, you get nicer steering wheel options, though.

You have to buy the table clamp from Fanatec for €30 however, and at the time of this review, it will not available for another month, which is certainly a factor if you want to start right away and do not have a rig to mount your wheel to. Prices and offers may vary by country and time, so be sure to double-check.

App.png

The companion app allows users to change wheel base settings on the fly.

Setup & Software​

Before we get into the actual game tests, a few words about setting up the MOZA R3. Everything is described well in the included manual, and in addition to the MOZA Pithouse software on the PC, I also tested the iOS app, which connects to the wheel base via Bluetooth and allows for firmware updates and fine tuning. It is basically like a mobile version of Pithouse and especially helpful for Xbox users. More about what you can actually adjust on the fly in a moment.

MOZA R3 Racing Bundle & ACC On Xbox​

I have often read the question about Assetto Corsa Competizione on Xbox under our last video – and I am sorry to disappoint you. It looks so promising when you start the sim - the menus can be operated, and the steering angle and pedals are even functional in the control settings. But once you head out on track, the car does not accept steering and throttle input. In the same controls menu used previously, there is no recognizable movement anymore.

ACC not working.png

Fans of Assetto Corsa Competizione on Xbox will be disappointed that the R3 Racing Bundle will not work with the game.

This is of course a big disappointment, even though ACC is not on the official compatibility list on the MOZA website – it is arguably the title that gets closest to PC sim racing on Xbox. We hope that this will change with a future update and will keep you updated!

On PC, the R3 works with ACC without problems. At 100% force in Pithouse and 80% FFB strength in game, you can even drive without clipping, so without losing effects on curbs or larger displacements. The feedback and the weight in the steering wheel, the resistance when turning and especially the center position – it is all there, but very muted and weak.

R3 Wheelbase.png

The R3 wheel base sports a very compact design.

You need to keep in mind that 3.9 Nm at peak is not really that much. Nevertheless, the Force Feedback is detailed and communicates the frequencies more finely, especially in comparison to the belt and gear-driven wheels. I have been using Logitech G27, Thrustmaster TX and Thrustmaster T150 wheels for many years and would definitely choose a weaker Direct Drive like the R3 in comparison, as it is also much quieter.

Oscillations when driving in a straight line were present not only in ACC, but it is possible to combat these with higher damper and friction settings. We hope MOZA will include a few more presets for the sim titles in their software going forward to make it more beginner friendly and provide the best possible FFB experience, because this little thing has some potential.

Assetto Corsa & EA Sports WRC​

Our best Xbox experience was with the original Assetto Corsa, which came to Xbox One in 2016, and EA Sports WRC. In AC, you have good control over the settings, and here it can come in handy to match the steering angle settings in the game and in the MOZA mobile app. I tested the same Porsche/Nordschleife combination with the PC version and the Force Feedback had a bit more depth in the latter, about 10-15% better than on the Xbox, and the input lag was also noticeably lower.

The bumpy rally stages allow the wheelbase to show its potential, and in WRC, the R3 had by far the most power of any title we tested. At the hands-on event at our office last week, we were also able to gather feedback from our community, who tested this exact setup on-site.

There were also die-hard sim racers who said this would be a great set for beginners or younger drivers. The small 11-inch form factor of the wheel also works well for this, and it also allows for better transfer of weaker forces compared to a heavier wheel with a larger diameter. The MOZA HBP Handbrake does also work with the base, so the list on their website we mentioned earlier is really the go-to source to check what will work and what not.

Backside.png

Other MOZA peripherals can be connected to the R3 wheel base, like the HBP Handbrake.

I also took a look at Forza Horizon 5 and noticed another issue: Not all button mappings allow custom assignment. For example, throttle, brake and gear shifting are hardcoded to the wheel buttons too. So although you have your pedals for this, due to the limitations of the Xbox control scheme, the N, P, S1 and S2 buttons cannot be used with custom assignments like "look left" or other functions in FH5. Regardless, this is really not the kind of game I would buy a steering wheel for. You can feel certain effects of the road, but there is no feeling at all for the weight of the car, and there is practically no reaction to counter-steering. Quite strange, but certainly not the fault of the R3.

Going back to the RPM indicator mentioned earlier: It does not work on the Xbox. Not for any title. You can turn it off in the Moza app, but the profiles reset themselves automatically when the game is restarted, so the indicator lights up again without purpose. MOZA should improve this and either make it functional or just turn it off in Xbox mode. Even on the PC, the indicator was not always reliable and sometimes got stuck.

MOZA R3 Racing Bundle: Pedals​

Next, I tried Automobilista 2 and F1 24 on the PC, focusing more on the pedals by driving cars without ABS - and this revealed the biggest weakness of the bundle. While the pedal travel is easy to control for casual drivers without big ambitions, and the set is very robustly constructed, there is almost no resistance, especially in the brake pedal. And it is not news that races are won on the brakes.

The development of muscle memory and brake feel is so important, especially in a Le Mans prototype or F1 car, and without a load cell, the feeling is simply missing in the long run.

SRP Pedals.png

Sturdy construction, but light pedal feel: The SRP-Lite pedals are not made with the development of muscle memory in mind.

Again, with both titles, I found the steering to be very spongy, but with practice and getting used to it, you can definitely find your pace and have fun. So if you want to take the whole sim racing thing a little bit more seriously, you might want to save up for a slightly stronger wheel base and pedals with a load cell anyway. The MOZA ecosystem already allows upgrades to slightly better pedals, the installation of a stronger spring and the entire range of steering wheels can be used on the R3 base.

ESX Wheel On Other Bases​

The key is that only the ESX wheel contains the chip for the Xbox, however. This also means that the stronger MOZA bases can be used on the Xbox with this wheel, and this wheel only. I tested it with the R12 and SR-P Load Cell pedals, and this also revealed that the PU Grip on the ESX is not that grippy anymore when you are running up to 12 Nm.

ESX on R12.png

Using the ESX Wheel, other MOZA bases become Xbox-compatible as well.

MOZA R3 Racing Bundle: Verdict​

In conclusion, I think MOZA has launched an attractive bundle for beginners or sim racers with a limited budget who want to take their experience to a new level. Since it took so long to introduce the product to the market, I would have expected it to be more complete, with ACC support on Xbox and a working RPM indicator.

In my personal opinion, those who only race on the PC are better off with the R5 bundle in the lower price range, or the Fanatec CSL DD with the option of upgrading to 8Nm later via the boost kit.

If you are planning on buying this product and you like what we do here at OverTake, please consider using our affiliate link to www.mozaracing.com. We make a small commission on each sale made using this link, without any extra costs for you. And with that, you support your favorite sim racing community, so that we can keep hosting all the downloads you need and post all the news, reviews, features and more.

What are your thoughts on the MOZA R3 Racing Bundle? Let us know on Twitter @OverTake_gg or in the comments below!
About author
Michel Wolk
- Joined the OverTake crew in April 2022
- Sim Racing & content creation since 2012
- Petrolhead, Rally fan, Subie driver, Nordschleife addict, Poké Maniac, Gamer, 90's kid

Current Rig Setup:
- Sim-Lab P1X Pro Cockpit
- 3x ASUS TUF Gaming VG32VQR
- RTX 4080, AMD 5800X3D, 32GB RAM
- Fanatec ClubSport DD+
- ClubSport Pedals V3
- ClubSport Shifter SQ V 1.5
- Moza HBP Handbrake

Comments

Premium
Xbox's limited button mapping and missing features strikes again. Don't you love it? Why put those features on anything licensed specifically for Xbox, when the consoles will not make use of it? This lack of feature support is one of the major reasons I left that platform for PC.
 
Premium
3,9nM are the Main reason to avoid it. I am still racing on a desk and was happy with a T300 (about 4,5nM) long time. But honestly the nM was not enough there. It has to be at least above 6nM+ to avoid clipping in most sims.
I am perfectly fine with my 8nM now. MozaR5 would be the logic choice
 
3,9nM are the Main reason to avoid it. I am still racing on a desk and was happy with a T300 (about 4,5nM) long time. But honestly the nM was not enough there. It has to be at least above 6nM+ to avoid clipping in most sims.
I am perfectly fine with my 8nM now. MozaR5 would be the logic choice
Where did you get those numbers? IIRC 3 9 Nm is the same torque that the T500 had, the T300 being lower at 3.3Nm, both behind the first Fanatec Clubsport at 4.4Nm.

This talk disregards the problems of any mechanical coupling system used on a wheelbase, plus the specific one of the T300, which is torque fade after sustained use in a long session, something Thrustmaster did not solve until the TS-PC. No matter if torque is equal, Direct Drive beats coupled systems in responsiveness and ruggedness, unless some truly lousy engineering was applied to the design.

Having said all of this: what I don't like about these budget bundles, is that they go against a golden rule of simracing: pedals > wheelbase. Having a load cell brake pedal that you can tune to the exact feeling that you want is more important than a Direct Drive. You can stay on an old gear-coupled Logitech and upgrade only pedals. Benefit will be greater.
 
Where did you get those numbers? IIRC 3 9 Nm is the same torque that the T500 had, the T300 being lower at 3.3Nm, both behind the first Fanatec Clubsport at 4.4Nm.
Actually, the T300 has 3.9Nm torque where as the T500 is over 4, closer to 6 like on the other higher-end beltdriven TM wheelbases
3,9nM are the Main reason to avoid it.
Maybe for you, for many other people (myself included) it will be plenty; it's about the same as a regular car & I can tell you that majority of people do not want to wrestle anything stronger when driving around in a game just for a few minutes at a time
 
Maybe for you, for many other people (myself included) it will be plenty; it's about the same as a regular car & I can tell you that majority of people do not want to wrestle anything stronger when driving around in a game just for a few minutes at a time
I completely agree with you. Due to lack of time, I manage to drive about four hours a month. I have a Moza R9 and pedals on a Load Cell. On the steering wheel, I rarely exceed 50% FFB and almost never 60%. A lot of effort on the steering wheel is uncomfortable for me due to lack of experience. And on the pedals there is somewhere 15-20kg, for the same reason. I agree that powerful bases are needed by those who already have few smaller values and they absolutely understand why they need more.
 
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Premium
Actually, the T300 has 3.9Nm torque where as the T500 is over 4, closer to 6 like on the other higher-end beltdriven TM wheelbases

Maybe for you, for many other people (myself included) it will be plenty; it's about the same as a regular car & I can tell you that majority of people do not want to wrestle anything stronger when driving around in a game just for a few minutes at a time
Sorry my mistake with T300 numbers, anyway everything under 6Nm provides clipping on fast corners with high downforce vehicles. That has nothing to do with wrestling the wheel. The wrestling begins later @Higher Nm´s With 3,9 you´re missing details.

IMO it has to be 6+Nm but 10Nm is moore than enough. For me 8 is sufficient

Btw. There are guys which will tell you a DD wheel has to be run with 15-25Nm :confused:
 
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Actually, the T300 has 3.9Nm torque where as the T500 is over 4, closer to 6 like on the other higher-end beltdriven TM wheelbases
I stand corrected, it was a long time since I checked on this facts, since everything is DD lately, and belt driven wheelbases are getting pushed out of the market :)


T500 is 4.4 Nm.

The rest of my post still stands though.
 
Sorry my mistake with T300 numbers, anyway everything under 6Nm provides clipping on fast corners with high downforce vehicles. That has nothing to do with wrestling the wheel. The wrestling begins later @Higher Nm´s With 3,9 you´re missing details.

IMO it has to be 6+Nm but 10Nm is moore than enough. For me 8 is sufficient

Btw. There are guys which will tell you a DD wheel has to be run with 15-25Nm :confused:
This is such a subjective thing though. I've known people who got Simucube systems with 20 Nm for the responsiveness and reliability, but used them at no more than 5 Nm. I also remember a guy owning an AccuForce, using it at no more than 6 Nm because he couldn't imagine wanting more. And he was an active rower, meaning that he didn't lack strength!!
 
Premium
This is such a subjective thing though. I've known people who got Simucube systems with 20 Nm for the responsiveness and reliability, but used them at no more than 5 Nm. I also remember a guy owning an AccuForce, using it at no more than 6 Nm because he couldn't imagine wanting more. And he was an active rower, meaning that he didn't lack strength!!
Yes i did not said anything else. But I stay with the fact 3,9 Nm do not give you clean FFB in all situations.
 

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