Sim Racing Pedals In 2024: Options For Budget, Mid-range & High-end

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Simucube Active Pedals. Image: Simucube
Pedals are one of the most important aspect of a sim racing setup. As Connor is looking for an upgrade, he has assembled a number of options for sim racing pedals in 2024 for different ranges.

This article comes from my need to upgrade my pedals. I am looking to upgrade my pedal set from the Thrustmaster T-3PA Pros to something more high-end. As the sim racing market can be confusing, I have assembled two of the best options at each price point - budget, mid-range and high-end. Of course, the list is not exhaustive.

All pedals listed feature loadcell technology, so they will be a big jump in performance if you are using a set without a one. At the bottom of the article, you can find a table with a handful of more options if the best two in each price point are not your style.

Keep in mind that prices tend to fluctuate a bit, so you might be able to find them at slightly different prices than listed in this article, depending on when you look into them.

Budget Option 1: Thrustmaster T-LCM​

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Image: Thrustmaster

Coming in at €230 brand new from Thrustmaster, the T-LCM set is the cheapest option that still gives you that step up in performance and reliability. The drawbacks are that the casing is plastic and does not feel particularly premium, and the pedals are all in a fixed position.

However, the pedal performance is remarkable for the price point. The T-LCM is Thrustmaster's flagship pedal set and can be used independently of a Thrustmaster wheelbase with USB connectivity. Unfortunately, this feature is exclusive to PC users.

Budget Option 2: Fanatec CSL LC​

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Image: Fanatec

Coming up to the CSL line's eighth birthday in August, the CSL LC (load cell) pedals still hold their own in the budget category within the pedal market. Their newer and much fancier counterparts are more advanced and have more options, but as a first set of loadcell pedals, you cannot go wrong with the CSL LCs.

They are adjustable with the amount of braking force required being easily tweaked through the Fanatec Tuning Menu (or Fanatec Control Panel on PC). You also get all three pedals for the asking price, so you do not have to pay extra for a clutch. A nice bonus: You can vary the position of all three pedals.

Contactless hall sensors are present on the throttle and clutch pedals, but the loadcell brake is what makes these pedals stand out at this price point. Second-hand, you can pick some of these up for less than €120, a new set will set you back €199.95.

If you are planning on buying this product and you like what we do here at OverTake, please consider using our affiliate link to www.fanatec.com. We make a small commission on each sale made using this link, without any extra costs for you. And with that, you support your favorite sim racing community, so that we can keep hosting all the downloads you need and post all the news, reviews, features and more.

Budget Option 3: Moza Racing SR-P​

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Image: MOZA Racing

MOZA Racing have boldly made their way into the sim racing industry. The affordability of their Direct Drive wheelbases is their main claim to fame, but their pedals are also fantastic with the SR-Ps being their mid-range option. For the level of technology on offer, the SR-Ps are a fantastic option for an upgrade.

MOZA's SR-P pedals also come with the option to add a clutch pedal. The addition is an extra cost, but if you are an adamant classic racer or enjoy cruising the world of Assetto Corsa free roam, the clutch pedal addition is a must-buy for these pedals. The two-pedal set usually retails at €199.

If you are planning on buying this product and you like what we do here at OverTake, please consider using our affiliate link to www.mozaracing.com. We make a small commission on each sale made using this link, without any extra costs for you. And with that, you support your favorite sim racing community, so that we can keep hosting all the downloads you need and post all the news, reviews, features and more.

Mid-Range Option 1: Fanatec Clubsport Pedals V3​

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Image: Fanatec

The Fanatec Clubsport pedals are now in their third generation. The evolution and development of these pedals are obvious in their new designs and internal changes. For instance, the electronics have been completely revised and the magnetic Hall sensors of the throttle and clutch pedals feature four times the resolution of the previous generation V2 pedals.

The custom load cell is undeniably durable and much more precise than the previous generations' offerings. As you drive, you can apply relatively strong pressure as you would in a real car and precisely control the brake with muscle memory. Again, this is a set that offers good value when you consider the price point, even more so for second-hand sets. A new set retails for €399.99.

If you are planning on buying this product and you like what we do here at OverTake, please consider using our affiliate link to www.fanatec.com. We make a small commission on each sale made using this link, without any extra costs for you. And with that, you support your favorite sim racing community, so that we can keep hosting all the downloads you need and post all the news, reviews, features and more.

Mid-Range Option 2: Asetek La Prima​

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Image: Asetek Sim Sports

Asetek chucked the rule book out the window when they created their La Prima pedals. The technology present in these pedals is sublime with a lot of components being shared with the more advanced Invicta pedal set.

Whilst the Forte Pedals are not hydraulic, they still offer the hydraulic sensation of a fully depressed brake pedal because of the M.L.C.P.C. patented braking system. This allows you to pressure modulate and trail brake well, thanks to the 2-stage system that can be found in the hydraulic Asetek product range.

Uniquely, Asetek allows racers to upgrade their hardware to higher-level models. The Danish company offers upgrade kits to transform the La Prima set to Forte or even the top-level Invicta specs.

The loadcell is engineered to have the same ratio of play regardless of your settings. This means that however you like to drive, you will have the full capabilities of the pedal at all times.

The only downside to these pedals at this price point is the lack of an included clutch pedal. This will set you back an extra €156 which arguably is not a lot, but it's another cost you have to take into consideration when deciding if the Asetek eco-system is for you. The two-pedal La Prima set is listed at €418.74.

If you are planning on buying this product and you like what we do here at OverTake, please consider using our affiliate link to www.asetek.com/simsports, where you can use our code overtakegg for a 5% discount . We make a small commission on each sale made using this link, without any extra costs for you. And with that, you support your favorite sim racing community, so that we can keep hosting all the downloads you need and post all the news, reviews, features and more.

Mid-Range Option 3: Simagic P2000​

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Image: Simagic

The starring aspect of the Simagic P2000 that makes them stand out from the mid-range competition is The brake cylinder system. It consists of a main pump and an auxiliary pump, connected via braided steel lines. It looks more like something you would find in a GT car than a set of sim racing pedals.

Simagic is normally categorised in the higher reaches of sim racing. Many either do not consider the brand for an upgrade or assume it is too expensive, but that is not necessarily the case. These pedals are fantastic value and the technology behind them is price-point-leading. The problem that could arise with them is the maintenance of the hydraulic lines and cylinder. If something were to break, it likely would not be a simple or cheap fix.

High-End Option 1: Heusinkveld Ultimate+​

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Image: Heusinkveld

The dutch manufacturer is perhaps the most famous name in the world of sim racing pedals, and the Heusinkveld Ultimate+ plays its part in defending this title with a well-loved and well-tested construction. The Ultimate+'s are class leaders, despite having a slightly lower load cell capacity than other similarly priced offers.

What makes these pedals undeniably brilliant is how well they have been engineered. Created in CAD and FEA to accurately simulate GT and F1 performance, these are premium quality sim pedals tested for up to one million cycles of use. This comes with €1.425,05 price tag for the three-pedal set, but it can also be had without a clutch for €1.159,51.

High-End Option 2: Asetek Invicta​

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Image: Asetek Sim Sports

Coming in at just under €1000, the Asetek Invicta brake and throttle pedal set are marketed as the ultimate upgrade for sim racers who are looking to never have to change their pedal set again by Asetek. The 'Hard' brake setup is a fantastic upgrade for anyone who is used to having to push their brake right to the floor to get the right amount of stopping power.

The downside? No included clutch pedal. That comes separately at an extra €314. You could get the Fanatec Clubsport V3 pedals in near-perfect condition on the second-hand market for this price, although they are at a different level, of course.

The Invicta pedals have what Asetek call the T.H.O.R.P hydraulic braking system, which uses a slave cylinder to simulate how a real brake would react with its calliper, disc, and pads. This is what sets Asetek's higher-end pedals out from their competition. At this price point, the sky is the limit. But Asetek has brought rather advanced technology in at under €1000.

If you are planning on buying this product and you like what we do here at OverTake, please consider using our affiliate link to www.asetek.com/simsports, where you can use our code overtakegg for a 5% discount . We make a small commission on each sale made using this link, without any extra costs for you. And with that, you support your favorite sim racing community, so that we can keep hosting all the downloads you need and post all the news, reviews, features and more.

High-End Option 3: Simucube Active Pedals​

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Image: Simucube

Strong, precise and a market leader - the Simucube Active Pedal is a rock-solid example of what can be done when you have the very best materials, technology and seemingly unlimited budgets at your disposal. When you start looking at the high-end pedals, you could potentially spend thousands. The Active Pedals are a fantastic option if you have that level of budget at your disposal.

With a 150kg loadcell pedal, the Active Pedals set has more adjustability and resistance than you will ever need in a set. This is also due to the active technology they use, as the name suggests. Instead of relying on springs or elastomers, the pedal is driven by an electric motor, making it infinitely adjustable. The same pedal can be used as a throttle, brake or clutch as a result.

Changing pedal behavior is a matter of just a few clicks in the Simucube software. Racers can go from a super stiff brake pedal that hardly moves to a road-car like pedal and anything in between in a matter of seconds.

The Active Pedal can be had as standalone, as well as in sets of 2 and three. Simucube also offers a separate throttle pedal that uses a more traditional construction to lighten the burden on your wallet. While the Simucube Throttle will set you back €333.39, a single Active Pedal costs €2378.81, a two-pedal set costs €4519.52. Talk about the absolute highest of high-end.

ProductLoadcell WeightBuild MaterialsCompatibilityPrice
Thrustmaster T-LCM100kgPlastic Case & Metal Pedals & FootplatePC & Console€230 / £197 / $249
Logitech Pro Pedals100kgPlastic Case & Metal Pedals & FootplatePC & Xbox€411 / £350 / $446
Moza SR-P100kgHigh Strength SteelPC & Console (via wheelbase w/ ESX wheel)€199 / £149 / $188
Moza CRP200kgCNC-Processed AluminiumPC & Console (via wheelbase w/ ESX wheel)€539 / £459 / $585
Fanatec CSL Elite Pedals V290kgCast and Machined AluminiumPC & Console (Via Wheelbase)€300 / £255 / $325
Fanatec CSL LC60kgAluminiumPC & Console (Via Wheelbase)€200 / £187 / $238
Fanatec Clubsport V390kgCNC-Machined AluminiumPC
PS4 / PS5 / Xbox X / Xbox S Via Wheelbase
€400 / £466 / $506
Simagic P1000i Inverted100kgAnodized AluminumPC€599 / £509 / $650
Simagic P2000200kgCNC-Machined AluminiumPC€799 / £676 / $857
Heusinkveld Sprints120kgCNC-Laser Cut Stainless SteelPC€762 / £648 / $826
Heusinkveld Ultimate+140kgCNC-Laser Cut Stainless SteelPC€1425 / £1270 / $1608
ProPedel GT200kgCNC-Machined Billet AluminiumPC€1102 / £945 / $1196
Asetek La Prima180kgAnodized AluminiumPC (Console Support Planned)€419 / £355 / $453
Asetek Forte180kgAnodized AluminiumPC€575 / £489 / $623
Asetek InvictaT.H.O.R.P. HydraulicAluminium & PlasticPC€950 / £807 / $1030
Asetek Invicta S-SeriesT.H.O.R.P. HydraulicBlack Anodized AluminiumPC€950 / £790/ $1000
Cube Controls SP01200kgCNC-Machined Aluminium & Carbon Fibre Pedal PlatesPC€900 / £770 / $976
Simucube ActivePedal (two-pedal set)150kgCNC-Laser Cut Stainless SteelPC€4520 / £3918 / $4962

Are you looking to upgrade your pedals? Let us know what option you would choose over on X @OverTake_gg or down in the comments below!
About author
Connor Minniss
Website Content Editor & Motorsport Photographer aiming to bring you the best of the best within the world of sim racing.

Comments

I just upgraded my CPU and prefer to keep my T300/T3PA-pro in favor for a new to buy RTX5070(ti) Vcard while in Okt 2025 with the end of Win10 (=exit WMR) I’m also forced to get me a new VR headset.
 
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Pedal options are endless nowadays, there are countless builders on most corners of the globe offering something of good quality that will probably be near your home. Maybe because building a pedañset that does most of the job is not overly difficult, and the differences between the well known options in the same price bracket can be quite small.
 
Premium
In the mid-range price bracket you can include SimForge Mark Is - unlike the SimJacks they're Indian rather than Chinese, which makes the support a little easier if nothing else.
Decent construction, lots of adjustability, and I found them a big step up from the Fanatec v3s which are about the same price. (And they were a big step up from T-LCMs, which were a big step up from Logitech's offering).
They're not as developed as the Heusinkvelds - yet, but they're worth considering if they fit your budget.
The name suggests there are further refinements coming, and I'd like to see some Mark IIs if they ever get made.

Of course what doesn't seem to have been mentioned is platform compatibility - unlike on PC if you play on a console you're stuck with whatever pedals you can connect to your wheelbase, though gadgets like the Drivehub expand compatibility a bit - at a price.
 
I want to change from the Asetek Forte Pedals to something else, but I don‘t know which pedals I should get. At the moment I‘m thinking about the Sim Lab XP-1 or the Simgrade VX Pro Pedals.
Would be so nice I you could tests these things before buying them!
 
I want to change from the Asetek Forte Pedals to something else, but I don‘t know which pedals I should get. At the moment I‘m thinking about the Sim Lab XP-1 or the Simgrade VX Pro Pedals.
Would be so nice I you could tests these things before buying them!
For me it was either the VRS or the Simgrade VXPro (throttle and brake only).

Ended up getting the VXPros as the reviews spoke only positives, and they were not wrong... short version: they are exceptional.

The pedals have a very small footprint and you can see that the designers have very clever design decisions which favourably impact the performance; less moving parts = less problems.

As for the action, if I can summaryse them in one sentence, it would be: "smooth yet precise". This is an engineer's engineer pedal. If anything, the adjustment of the pedal plates is somewhat limited, but I did not need to make many adjustments. There are not many but check the previews/reviews online, they are spot on.

In my opinion, the VXPros are quite underrated for the features they offer, especially considering the attractive price point.
 
Looking at the low to mid range stuff, I've heard that the T-LCM's have poor manufacturing quality, the pedals have side-wobble, and the lack of adjustability could be a dealbreaker for some. They're obviously worth considering if you're locked in to the TM ecosystem and / or on a budget, but that's maybe where the appeal stops with these.

I personally rate (and have) Fanatec's CSL Elite V2's. This article seems to skim past them in favour for talking about the V3's, but the V2's are extremely solid (in both construction and performance) and in my opinion shouldn't be overlooked due to their very sweet spot in price to performance (and platform compatibility).

Although I've not used the V3's, I've never felt the V2's to have any issues nor inadequacies, and I've not had a single moment when I wished I had more. The accelerator pedal has all the precision that I (and I think anyone else) would need and require, and the load cell brake is gorgeous to use - it's 100% accurate and consistent and feels like it's tapping into your mind by how intuitive it is.

From my research, the main plus point of the V3's is its better clutch (although I don't use one myself) but the V3's have the downside of apparently needing the brake performance kit to make it perform on par with the V2's, which all considered make them significantly more expense in comparison - hence why I went with the V2's for an all-you-need out-of-the-box solution.

Maybe an even higher priced set will somehow add something extra to the experience, but I'm just not sold on that as they must surely be deep within the realms of diminishing returns and wallet / schlong waving territory. I'm the type that does take pride in appearance of my simrig & equipment, and in this case I even prefer the look of the V3's over the V2's, but while I respect the design and construction behind the high end stuff or even just newer iterations of medium end stuff, in my opinion none of that is necessary as something like the V2's will perform perfectly well which (to me) is all that's truly important.
 
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Premium
This was a rough listen. Did you have to copy, paste and repeat the same affiliate link text? Couldn't you write it once at the top or bottom of the article, and list the different websites there?

I listened to TTS reading this as I drove home, and every affiliate link was like a bookend. No, on second thought it was like the call-sign of your favorite rapper. You hear the bum saying it in every damn song. It makes me not want to listen to their album, like it makes me not want to listen to any more overtake articles.
 
For 200e you can have a very good pedal set better than the thrust and fanatec CS V3 on aliE.
 
Fanatec V3 above the elite V2? Every review tells the opposite, the brake of the V2's is better and it's 100 euro less so wrong advice here.

Besides that: Simgrade VXPro's, VRS and the Simtrecs Pro Pedal GT and all better value than the heusinkveld ultimates. It's subjective but at least the should all have been in the list.
 
You forgot the 200€ brandless options from A-E website that just are the same thing as Heusinkveld you mentionned.
With a bit of extra parts, tweaking and 3D printing, I manage to integrate a proper hydraulic brake caliber system converting force data into signal for the brake cable to the USB controller and this works like a charm
 

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It’s a good overview, only for newbie’s like I was in 2019, are normally buying a complete set pedals/Wheels, maybe it’s also great to post an overview of lowers priced starter sets, as so much new sets are available.
Why back in 2019 a guy at the Dutch HWinfo did help me in selecting an decent entry level set, T300 Ferrari.
 
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And yet no mention of real race pedal set for sim racing? Ricmotech Tilton 600’s I personally use in my setup. Once you go real, everything else is “just a simulation “
I'm not doubting you at all, but I'm just legit curious as to what exactly these types of pedals bring to the table? I presume they must feel different to "simulation" pedals, but as I've never used anything of that tier I'm left wondering what that extra or different feel feels like, and how that makes them better? Is it an objective matter due to mechanical / systematic reasons or just subjective / preference?
 

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