F1 24's Updated Car Performance and Handling Explained

F1 24's Revised Physics Explained.jpg
While we haven’t tested it yet, on paper it sounds like significant changes have been made to how the next Formula 1 driving game will perform.

The roll-out of EA SPORTS F1 24 details has begun in earnest, with a focus on claimed physics upgrades being released today, 22nd April.

Recent releases in the series, such as F1 22, witnessed on-the-limit snaps which were not communicated fluently to the driver. F1 23 was seen as a step forward by some in this regard.

While the 2024 game runs on a variation of the longstanding Ego engine, developer Codemasters is insistent that notable updates will change how it drives.


Updated Tyre Model and Suspension Systems​


This begins with further tweaks to its tyre model, with work on its behaviour at the peak slip angle and including tyre temperature as a wear factor. Wet weather behaviour is said to be ‘refined’ – running into damp patches on a drying track will cool your rubber.

The predominately Birmingham-based team has worked a new suspension kinematic model, with dynamic camber gain and toe change. The difference in turn radius between the front tires (aka the Ackermann affect) is now factored in.

The aforementioned tyre model is claimed to have been updated in unison with the suspension changes, as have spring and damper forces.

Engine braking strength can now also be adjusted within transmission setup options.

F1 24 Physics.jpg


“You'll notice the chassis respond more positively to your interests as a driver, whether it's feathering the brakes to trail brake into an apex, or feeling the suspension squat and tyres bite into the track as load shirts rearward under acceleration,” said Casey Ringley to OverTake, Senior Game Designer and Vehicle Handling Lead for the game.

Ringley is a sim racing industry veteran, starting out on GT Legends and GTR2, before working with Slightly Mad Studios through its Project CARS tenure. Following Electronic Arts’ purchase of Codemasters, he moved to lead the vehicle handling team for F1 23 in place of a departing David Greco.

Aero and ERS Changes​


The aerodynamic systems allegedly now factor in chassis rake (differences between front and rear ride height), alongside a revision on how cars behave when in a slipstream. The strength of the drag reduction system (DRS) should now be linked to the rear wing drag levels and turbulent air is supposedly noticeable.

The team states that it has implemented a different aerodynamic model for each team to try and match each of their real-world characteristics.

“Williams is a strong example of this, with its outstanding performance at low downforce circuits,” explained Ringley.

“This year, we are already seeing similar differences, with Ferrari looking very efficient at high speeds. Red Bull and McLaren are rocket ships in mid-speed cornering. Those are the kinds of differences you will be feeling in the cars this year.”

F1 24 Aerodynamics CFD.jpg


The final potentially significant point is energy usage. Theoretically, drivers can harvest electrically using throttle control alone, should they choose. All ERS modes will be available across all sessions – in F1 23, for example, they were only available in practice, before being locked to specific types for qualifying and the race.

That’s a lot to digest. Ultimately, F1 24 will be judged by how these systems come together on track and in player’s hands.

Is it a cohesive driving experience, or does it feel like more of the same? We'll hopefully find out ahead of its release with our full review.

For now, let us know in the comments below which elements of the F1 game’s driving dynamics you’d like to see improved when compared to recent instalments.
About author
Thomas Harrison-Lord
A freelance sim racing, motorsport and automotive journalist. Credits include Autosport Magazine, Motorsport.com, RaceDepartment, OverTake, Traxion and TheSixthAxis.

Comments

I certainly won't write '24 off at this stage. Ringley comes with a very healthy resume and deserves some credit if '23 was his first showing with CM's F1 team, delivering tangible improvements to the handling over '22 (supposedly...I skipped many years of the title until I gave '23 a shot). The [supposed] improvements discussed in this article read more like designer notes than typical outlandish EA marketing, as evidenced by the lack of marketable catch phrases/terms that EA is known for.

Optimism might be a stretch for what I'm feeling, but I'll absolutely remain neutral until people get hands-on time with it. If they can bring the driving experience more towards the sim side of things, it could be an amazing experience. The general F1 atmosphere is unbeatable in the franchise, if we can get the driving to match then I would certainly sink some hours into a career/team builder mode.
 
I The [supposed] improvements discussed in this article read more like designer notes than typical outlandish EA marketing, as evidenced by the lack of marketable catch phrases/terms that EA is known for.
Agreed - I think that's down to how it's written. I see other outlets have gone with "the handling IS improved because of this and that, and it WILL be better because of etc..." which is taking EA's claims as a fact. I like how here it seems open, but skeptical.
 
There's always a tradeoff between making the driving more realistic and adapting all of this talk and feel to the casual fans that the series is aiming to sell games for. I also feel like the F1 series has achieved a bit of FIFA status (it grew and estabilished itself as a known quantity, before EA even took over), so people will never stop complaining every year. I think what we'll eventually see in the future is just feature-shuffling and these kind of random physics updates where you go "wait, didn't they enhance suspension physics like 2 years ago?", because they're just trying to throw something at the wall so people who complain every year about different things buy the game again.
 
There's always a tradeoff between making the driving more realistic and adapting all of this talk and feel to the casual fans that the series is aiming to sell games for. I also feel like the F1 series has achieved a bit of FIFA status (it grew and estabilished itself as a known quantity, before EA even took over), so people will never stop complaining every year. I think what we'll eventually see in the future is just feature-shuffling and these kind of random physics updates where you go "wait, didn't they enhance suspension physics like 2 years ago?", because they're just trying to throw something at the wall so people who complain every year about different things buy the game again.

It's definitely at the point where it's just another sports title like FIFA, Madden or NBA 2k... Recycled each year with some small differences to make it feel like that year... A live service game is definitely far better than a yearly release...

That trade off between casual gamers and sim racers happens in all titles, some just get the balance better than others... Because it's the casual gamer that plays the game on default set ups once a month for a few months here and there that makes these companies the most money... Especially if they buy DLC to pad out their experience...
 
That a simple basic rule as the Ackerman effect never been implemented, shame on them!
Got all of the F1's since 2017. From the discount corner off course.
But none of them were very satisfying to drive.
Fast moving graphics always had very blurry AA (23 edition was a bit better).
I hope they get their act together this time (as i hoped so many years before)
 

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I like that the article says allegedly and supposedly, the skepticism comes through and it is fully justified. I have not bought into this series for maybe 6 or 7 years due to the dumbing down of it and even prior to then not every year. Unlike the late 90s and early 00s when all I would buy were the F1 games and would only race F1 games.
 
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Premium
Interested in pre-ordering this but have not done so for several years neither with the F1 titles.
Have little confidence this is worth full price and early admission....

Based on previous releases.
If I pre-order does this let me experience all the bugs/issues this title launches with, 3 days early before others? Should I see that as a bonus, rather than negative?


Black Flag !
Sorry but as an adult, I will not be swayed by "YT influencers" with scripted narratives, who care no.1 about their own benefits they gain from such promotions. The partnering "influencers" cannot be trusted to be impartial or will not raise issues the title has, nor may give fully legit opinions on it.


Deception ?
The reason usually in such scenarios, they are controlled in what they can or cannot say/do.
It's like "reality TV culture". Believing or persuaded with something that is not real/genuine because it is made to appear as real/genuine.


Congratulations !
If indeed this title launches with no bugs/issues or less than previous offerings.
I really do hope it improves in the fun/challenge/experience it offers, as a game as well but think, I will hold back 2-3 months so *probable fixes are sorted and this title is available much cheaper. At the very least, it will be improved over its (launch date version) and by then we will have a better idea of what the "genuine opinions" about the game are.

Lets see....
 
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That a simple basic rule as the Ackerman effect never been implemented, shame on them!
Got all of the F1's since 2017. From the discount corner off course.
But none of them were very satisfying to drive.
Fast moving graphics always had very blurry AA (23 edition was a bit better).
I hope they get their act together this time (as i hoped so many years before)
You've been buying F1 games for 7 years and none of them were satisfying to drive?
 
Are you allowed to crowd fund a game without consent, to make a person make a game? I feel like we need to get Geoff Crammond out of bed
 
Last year's title wasn't bad in terms of improved handling. Apart from the poor initial bugs and graphics issues, it ran quite well. Hopefully this year's new improvements to handling have it close to realistic.
 
That a simple basic rule as the Ackerman effect never been implemented, shame on them!
Got all of the F1's since 2017. From the discount corner off course.
But none of them were very satisfying to drive.
Fast moving graphics always had very blurry AA (23 edition was a bit better).
I hope they get their act together this time (as i hoped so many years before)
Grand Hotel Hairpin: (Turn 6) is the great example. In any F1xx you can't take it as the real world do!
 
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