Logitech G PRO Wheel Review

Logitech G PRO Wheel Review.jpg
Logitech’s first sim racing wheelbase to feature a direct drive system is here, as the company known for its entry-level G-series wheels looks to compete in the upper tiers of the sim hardware market.

Logitech supplied the PRO wheel for this review free of charge, though the opinions and words are my own. The wheel was tested on PC using Assetto Corsa, Assetto Corsa Competizione, Automobilista 2 and DiRT Rally 2.0.


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Introduction and Overview

Logitech’s PRO series represents a new business direction for the hardware manufacturer. In addition to the wheel featured in this review, Logitech has also released a new three-pedal set with a load cell brake.

The aim of the PRO series appears to be to establish Logitech as a maker of not only entry and mid-tier wheelbases like the G27, G29 and G923, but also a manufacturer of professional-grade sim hardware.

Logitech PRO Wheel Features

The external appearance of the PRO wheel seems to betray the concept of competing in the pro-grade market, as the shell of the wheelbase is plastic. This shell is exceptionally large for a sim racing wheelbase, measuring 300mm (about 12”) at its widest point, and 220mm (nearly 9”) deep. The base is more stylized than many other offerings on the market, with the shell tapering both upward and rearward.

Within this base is a motor capable of 11 Newton-meters of peak torque. This figure places the PRO Wheel into a space competing with the Fanatec CSL DD and Boost Kit, the Simagic Alpha-mini / M10, and the Moza Racing R9.

The PRO base is capable of mounting directly onto the wheelbase plate of a cockpit using the threaded holes on the bottom of the unit or can be fastened temporarily to a desk using the included clamp.

At the rear of the wheelbase are the connection ports for power, USB micro, and peripherals. The USB micro connection is used to connect the PRO wheel to either a PC or console. Both PlayStation and Xbox versions of this Logitech wheel are available.

Configuration of the PRO wheel is achieved either via the G Hub software on PC, or by setup menus displayed on the wheelbase’s OLED screen navigated by the rotary encoders on the steering wheel.

The included steering wheel is leather-wrapped and primarily constructed of metal. It features magnetic shift paddles and dual analog clutch paddles at the rear. There is an included quick release for connecting to the wheelbase. Power and data are communicated between the wheel and wheelbase without external cables. The wheel includes two rotary encoders, an 8-way joystick, and 11 additional buttons inspired by the respective console.

The PRO Wheel also utilizes Logitech’s TrueForce technology. This system uses in-game audio and telemetry to recreate select force feedback effects that might otherwise be missed.

Logitech G PRO Wheel 02.jpg


Performance

Logitech’s PRO Wheel might be confused for an entry to mid-level offering by dint of its plastic shell, but the performance of the wheel across a variety of racing sims erases any such confusion.

The PRO wheel provides an impressive level of strength and definition in its force feedback. The G Hub software allows for individual game profiles to be configured, and presets for most common driving simulators are included. In addition, Logitech provides recommended in-game settings on their website.

Road bumps, curb details, vehicle impacts, rolling resistance and more are recreated in impressive detail. The TrueForce system supplements this in games that support the technology, and does add some welcome detail. Users can tweak the active force feedback profile to their specific needs and find a balance of strength and detail.

The steering wheel is well built and feels both comfortable and robust in hand. The overall design and button layout is not particularly inspiring or visually appealing, but there does seem to have been considerations to ergonomics during design, as all the buttons can easily be reached during normal driving.

Shifting using the magnetic paddles is precise and doesn’t generate as much noise as some offerings in the sim racing space. The analog paddles for clutch or handbrake function also perform well, and offer a long, smooth travel.

Value

Apart from the plastic exterior of the wheelbase, the price is what is likely to draw the most criticism of the Logitech PRO wheel.

Logitech has established themselves as a leading brand in the beginner and entry-level sim racing hardware market, but the PRO series hardware elevates them to a higher market level. The $999 / €1,099 price point for a Logitech wheel is likely to surprise some people, but seems less imposing in context.

Mid-tier direct drive wheel and wheelbase solutions including features like the magnetic shifters, quick release, and analog clutch pedals from companies such as Fanatec and Simagic sell for roughly the same price. Moza Racing offers a cheaper mid-tier wheel and wheelbase with similar features, but it lacks console compatibility.

Beating instead of matching their competitors’ price for a mid-range direct drive solution could have potentially positioned Logitech as the company to beat in this space, but priced as it is, consumers will have to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the PRO system versus the competitors.

Because this PRO Wheel represents Logitech’s first entry into the enthusiast or professional market, it has the disadvantage of a small supporting product line. Pedals are currently offered in the PRO series, and a new cockpit looks to be in the late stages of design, but other steering wheels or a PRO series h-pattern shifter or handbrake are notably absent at this time.

Logitech G PRO Wheel 03.jpg


Summary

Logitech’s PRO Wheel represents a positive step forward for the company as they evolve from being an entry and mid-tier sim hardware company to a company with offerings for enthusiasts with larger budgets and higher expectations.

Its performance is an impressive opening salvo into this new space, but questionable aesthetic design choices such as the plastic wheelbase housing and the overall size of the base may turn consumers off.

Impressive force feedback detail and strength, strong game compatibility across PC and console, magnetic shifters, analog paddles and a high-quality, comfortable wheel offered in a single solution from a reputable brand seems to justify the price. At $999 / €1,099 absent pedals, the PRO Wheel will appeal to a much narrower audience than previous G-series wheels but should be given serious consideration for those with that budget in mind or chasing similar performance and features in a sim racing wheel.

An expanded line of offerings such as a formula wheel of equal grade to the wheel currently included with the PRO Wheel, plus peripherals such as an h-pattern shifter will be crucial for Logitech to establish themselves as a leader in this new space they are entering, but this wheel is certainly a good start.

The Logitech PRO Wheel easily ranks among the best sim racing wheels I have tested in terms of its performance. Driving with it puts any questionable aesthetic choices out of mind, and lets you enjoy the sensations of driving in your favourite sim with a level of haptic detail few offerings can match.

Pros:
  • Force feedback quality
  • Console compatibility
  • Individual game presets and in-game settings suggestions
  • Desk clamp or hard-mounting options
  • Easy-to-use and strong quick release
  • OLED screen for wheel tuning
Cons:
  • Plastic wheelbase shell
  • No formula wheel or peripherals at release
  • Large wheelbase footprint
  • Generic looking steering wheel
About author
Mike Smith
I have been obsessed with sim racing and racing games since the 1980's. My first taste of live auto racing was in 1988, and I couldn't get enough ever since. Lead writer for RaceDepartment, and owner of SimRacing604 and its YouTube channel. Favourite sims include Assetto Corsa Competizione, Assetto Corsa, rFactor 2, Automobilista 2, DiRT Rally 2 - On Twitter as @simracing604

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Comments

Premium
It is expensive, but not more as a csl dd + wheel

If it is as robust as the G25 i sold last week after years and years of simracing, why not

( i am myself not o the wait because i purchased a CSL DD some months ago ; what a wheel base!)
 
Club Staff
Premium
If it is as robust as the G25 i sold last week after years and years of simracing, why not

This is what surprises me the most with the Logitech wheels I've had. Since 2005, I've had 4 Logitech wheels, only one was changed due to wear&tear.
Logitech Driving Force Pro (Gran Turismo 4) wheel from 2005 to 2012.
G27 from 2012 to 2015
New G27 from 2015 to 2020 (new wheel as I managed to ruin the pedals of the first G27, and it was easier to just buy a new one than wait for pedals...).
That G27 wheel broke during 2020, and because I had stored the old G27 wheel in a place that got very humid, it was moldy and broken... my fault again.
So now I have a G29 wheel, the old G27 pedals and G27 shifter.

I'll probably keep using it until it breaks! :)
 
It is expensive, but not more as a csl dd + wheel

If it is as robust as the G25 i sold last week after years and years of simracing, why not

( i am myself not o the wait because i purchased a CSL DD some months ago ; what a wheel base!)


Because I've been extremely unlucky with a large number of sim racing equipment getting broken down (many), anytime I hear about the durability aspect of sim racing gear I get turned on.

Maybe we should start thinking about the longevity aspect when buying sim racing gear. The difference between buying a piece of technology that will die on you (brick) 1-2 years later and a piece of equipment that you can sell for 2/3 or half of the original price 1-2 years later when you want to upgrade is HUGE.

I've heard stories and stories and stories of sim racers who've had a Logitech G25 and Logitech G27 that ran for more than ten years and in the end kept them in the closet as reserve when they upgraded to a DD and it warms my heart (to be fair and honest there is one guy who went out of his way to write a page-long reply and post many links to prove that Logitech pedals were garbage and that the wheel bases had known faults...etc but that's one guy against maybe 30-40 people who testified to Logitech's reliability).


Long story short:

We need statistics, polls or forum pages about sim racing equipment durability, something like Consumer Reports, JD-Power and Associate or like Insurance Wise to know which products live the longest (considering the price off course), because you can't find such information in the sim racing world, because sim racing is niche and reviewers can't have enough budget to be totally subjective unbiased no matter how hard they honestly tried, they tell you something like, "the wheelbase/ pedals/ motion sim hasn't showed any sign of wear-and-tear during my 1 hour long tough [Joe or Bob or...who ever] review process", but I usually use my stuff for more than 1 hour. :)
 
good to hear about other guys also keeping their G27 in the DRY and SAFE closet as a fallback option once their new and more costly gear breaks down. It's what I do as well, thing still runs smoothly after slightly less than a decade of use, but my son replaced his t50, so I got lucky. Unfortunately, we won't know if this new DD wheel keeps that standard until about 2032, so bad luck ... Very interesting read, especially after Thrustmaster have also entered the market, golden times for consumers!
 
I prefer Moza R9 with Moza GS V2 GT Wheel for around $ 900 dollars. Moza looks more PRO with less plastic looking-toy.

I don't want to rant Logitech for their new DD steering wheel. But this thing shouldn't cost more than $800 dollars. Maybe $1,000 with the pedals included sound fair to me.
 
Is there a specific reason that the pedals are not included in this review? I think that there won't be many buyers that buy this wheel but other pedals. I could be wrong of course. But it's still interesting why the pedals are not included in the review....

At cons should be added:
- No option to install "original wheels" like momo/sparco wheels for example. This is the biggest con to me personally so it should have been in the cons list.
 
Because I've been extremely unlucky with a large number of sim racing equipment getting broken down (many), anytime I hear about the durability aspect of sim racing gear I get turned on.

Maybe we should start thinking about the longevity aspect when buying sim racing gear. The difference between buying a piece of technology that will die on you (brick) 1-2 years later and a piece of equipment that you can sell for 2/3 or half of the original price 1-2 years later when you want to upgrade is HUGE.

I've heard stories and stories and stories of sim racers who've had a Logitech G25 and Logitech G27 that ran for more than ten years and in the end kept them in the closet as reserve when they upgraded to a DD and it warms my heart (to be fair and honest there is one guy who went out of his way to write a page-long reply and post many links to prove that Logitech pedals were garbage and that the wheel bases had known faults...etc but that's one guy against maybe 30-40 people who testified to Logitech's reliability).


Long story short:

We need statistics, polls or forum pages about sim racing equipment durability, something like Consumer Reports, JD-Power and Associate or like Insurance Wise to know which products live the longest (considering the price off course), because you can't find such information in the sim racing world, because sim racing is niche and reviewers can't have enough budget to be totally subjective unbiased no matter how hard they honestly tried, they tell you something like, "the wheelbase/ pedals/ motion sim hasn't showed any sign of wear-and-tear during my 1 hour long tough [Joe or Bob or...who ever] review process", but I usually use my stuff for more than 1 hour. :)

I have had my G29 since 2016 with not issues like gears weird sounds, misalignments or woobles like some others have report. I haven't had any problems with motors being hot or loss of strength. The leather from the wheel still looks great because I use gloves and the conductive rubber inside the buttons are working like new.

I remember when I destroyed the inside conductive rubber pads of my Logitech Driving Force Pro playing rFactor because I used the d-pads for pit functions :roflmao:. I was mad because there was no replacements:sick:
 
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Club Staff
Premium
I've heard stories and stories and stories of sim racers who've had a Logitech G25 and Logitech G27 that ran for more than ten years and in the end kept them in the closet as reserve when they upgraded to a DD and it warms my heart

The G29 wheel I have now (pedals are stored safely as backup pedals) I got for free from a buddy who had it as his spare wheel. So while the G29 was new for me in 2020, it wasn't new in 2020. He also got it it used when he got it. So I have no idea how old the wheel actually is. It works perfectly fine though!

good to hear about other guys also keeping their G27 in the DRY and SAFE closet

I have learned!!! :cautious::redface:
 
Premium
I've found that the difference between the middling G29 and the top end stuff is that the top end stuff simply confuses the hell out of me, when I bought the G29 I got the lot, wheel, wires, pedal set and a manual shifter.
I didn't need to read up on what I was getting as the picture told me everything to expect, and that's what I got.
Now I've looked at upgrading, but only looked and not deeply, I don't want to have a degree in computer paraphernalia to make a purchase I just want a bit better than my current wheel... "that's gonna be a grand sir" Ok, I could be persuaded to fire up a grand for it, but, I'm very unsure about what I'll actually get and how much more I'm gonna get stung for for all the stuff that I didn't realise wasn't included, added to that I'm gonna have to get another chair*... or do I spend out on a race seat rig? and then I say to myself, I only play GTR2 and GT Legends, (I've finished GT7) and then I come back to it and say, sod it I keep what I've got and hope it don't break.

* My 'XRocker is fr*kkin disgraceful for the £125 I spent out on it, it's hard, it's too low and the height adjuster drops to lowest every 30 seconds, oh, and the casters are worse than a supermarket trolley... and the arm rests disintegrated after 3 months, so, Yeah, they certainly saw me coming.
 
My G25 from at least 15 years ago - it was still new tech - is still being used from a friend. In the meantime i broke two T300 wheelbases. Now got a simucube and I think it'll last at least as long.
 
Premium
My logitech g25 i sold last week is probably from 2006 or 2007.
It has a special story, because i got it some weeks begore it was available to public release, from of friend of mine working at logitech at that time.

It has always work without any problem, with all simulations, with Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 7, Windows 10.
 
Last edited:
I've found that the difference between the middling G29 and the top end stuff is that the top end stuff simply confuses the hell out of me, when I bought the G29 I got the lot, wheel, wires, pedal set and a manual shifter.
I didn't need to read up on what I was getting as the picture told me everything to expect, and that's what I got.
Now I've looked at upgrading, but only looked and not deeply, I don't want to have a degree in computer paraphernalia to make a purchase I just want a bit better than my current wheel... "that's gonna be a grand sir" Ok, I could be persuaded to fire up a grand for it, but, I'm very unsure about what I'll actually get and how much more I'm gonna get stung for for all the stuff that I didn't realise wasn't included, added to that I'm gonna have to get another chair*... or do I spend out on a race seat rig? and then I say to myself, I only play GTR2 and GT Legends, (I've finished GT7) and then I come back to it and say, sod it I keep what I've got and hope it don't break.

* My 'XRocker is fr*kkin disgraceful for the £125 I spent out on it, it's hard, it's too low and the height adjuster drops to lowest every 30 seconds, oh, and the casters are worse than a supermarket trolley... and the arm rests disintegrated after 3 months, so, Yeah, they certainly saw me coming.
try a t500, mine is (I think) 6 or 7 years old, pedals broke down three years ago but they have a great load cell set for a reasonable price, so actually one should get that straight away.
 
The only reason I changed my g25 was the PS4. I had it since about 2008 to about 2015.

I got the g29 for £99 in the Currys sale. Then I just decided I wanted a t300 and sold the wheel for more than I paid for it.

Now I'm just sitting out until CSL DD restocks.
 
As good as this product may be by itself in terms of quality and performance, it feels overpriced, and a bit of a dissapointment from a brand which perhaps some of us thought it would do a better job in bringing Direct Drive technology closer to more racing games users. To me, current tag is a shameless cash grab, and we will have to wait maybe a couple years till it drops to a more rational value. Just like it happened with the G29.

As of now, if you are not interested in consoles, you cannot beat what Simagic and Moza are offering.
 
This wheel makes me feel as if Logitech doesn't know what they want to be. From one side the electronics and FFB seem to be up to the task, but then they price it at a price point in where it is unacceptable to build it in a plastic carcass, the shape of the wheelbase is too big and too ugly, the wheel seems like a copy-paste from the g25 one with some xbox buttons and 2 rotary encoders positioned in a way that triggers the OCD that I don't have.

I was expecting another G25 moment from them after Fanatec opened the pandora's box of "affordable" DD. I was expecting from a giant in electronics manufacturing as Logitech to take advantage of the economics of scale.

I was expecting from them something a lot closer to the shape and size of Fanatec's smallest DD but in a plastic enclosure to compete in price and suffocate Thrustmaster and all the minions that have appeared from nowhere wanting a piece of that affordable DD cake.

But Logitech seems to not understand their own strenghts, and maybe the MBAs wanted a change in strategy and try to compete with the lowest priced Fanatec products in Fanatec's own premium niche.

That's wrong, Fanatec already has a loyal fanbase way too economically invested in their ecosystem, Fanatec has created also a very big ecosystem ranging from premium plastic wheels to luxury ones. And Logitech wants to take a bite to that cake?, give me a break.

Logitech not only starts from 0 a new ecosystem. They start a new ecosystem that as of now only consist in the incredibly dated G25 wheel with another restyling that still gives a cheapish feeling. And a wheelbase that feel plasticy and cheapish, meanwhile Fanatec products feel premium.

Logitech doesn't know what they want to be, if Logitech want to compete with the lowest priced Fanatec products then Logitech needs to step up a lot in their product appearance and software features (the wife of the emperor not only has to be honest, she has to look as if she is it). Logitech can't compete with plasticy pseudo-premium wheelbases with "gaming" design and wheels with plasticy looking wheelbases an wheels that have a weird design on top of that.

Logitech survived in this niche thanks to the G25 heritage. That wheel at the time of it's release if we don't count small luxury wheels and pedals that were manufactured only by hundreds or mere thousand of units was the best wheelbase, pedals and shifter on the market by a country mile. An entire half decade of simracing was shaped by the G25 and G27, after that Logitech decided to stop competing in releasing new products. Instead they kept releasing the G25 with small restylings and competing in price.

People kept buying those G25 restyling wheels because not only it was one of the cheapest wheels on the market, but also because the G25 had a design that turned to have LEGENDARY reliability. Those restylings have been the introductory wheelbase in simracing for a entire generation and a half.

And now Logitech has make a DD wheel that leave unsatisfied the people that want a really affordable DD wheel.

There is 0 reasons for a DD wheel being substancionally more expensive than any of the G25 restylings:
-In the front of the electronics there is nothing there that needs to be expensive nor custom made ICs, there is no bleeding edge high technology there at all.
-From the motor point of view it should be more expensive, but the DD motor doesn't need reduction gears
-The wheel doesn't need an extra bearing to hold the steering column because it can use the axle of the DD motor as steering column, it also saves the need to manufacture the wheel ending plastic stops as the DD wheels don't have physical end stops.
-Plastic moulds are expensive AF, the manufacturers are saving on a lot of them by the mere DD design that is a design with a lot less pieces and a lot less compex.

So, if anything the DD wheels should be not that far from the cheapest on the market, instead we had them become the most expensive ones by a stupid margin. All that just because of an artificial market segmentation made to avoid the new wheelbases cannibalizing the sells of the old tech ones.

This Logitech wheel feels like an insult to me as a consumer, I rather purchase one of those new minion companies wheelbases. They at least know who they are, they are cheaper and feel way more solid and premium, even if I'm sure that Logitech's quality control, internal design and electronics design has to be way better than any of those minion companies. Plastic at that price point feels like an insult, The entire wheelbase + wheel at 400-499€ would had felt right made in plastic. At almost 1000€ feels like an insult to me.
 

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