MotoGP 24: Riders Market And Revised Moto2 Handling Showcased

MotoGP 24 - Riders Market And Revised Moto2 Handling Showcased.jpg
The rider transfer market has been detailed for MotoGP 24, following only a brief overview previously.

One of the most significant new features for this year’s official MotoGP game is the ‘Riders Market’ - but aside from a very brief snippet in the reveal trailer, how it works has not been entirely clear.

Now, a dedicated trailer for this element has been released – and, well, it’s still not entirely clear.

But, at the very least, further details are now obvious.


In the main single-player career in past Milestone-developed MotoGP games, you can create your own team or ride for an existing outfit as you progress through the various undercard tiers.

But, at the end of each season, while you could negotiate a deal to switch teams and even classes, nothing else changed. The next in-game, all of the rosters remained the same, apart from you.

At least, this changes with MotoGP 24. Following the initial teaser only showing top-class riders switch, though, it was believed that the system could be extremely restricted.

MotoGP 24 Riders Market.jpg


However, now it has been showcased that other riders switch teams, selected by the AI and some riders even get promoted through the ranks.

For example, current Moto2 rider Celestino Vietti is shown to have moved up a category to the VR46 MotoGP squad. This is pertinent, as Vietti is a member of the VR46 Academy.

Meanwhile, current Moto3 rider Daniel Holgado moves up and into Vietti’s vacated Red Bull KTM Ajo Moto2 seat.

What happens in the premier category remains to be seen, but presumably some riders retire.

Tweaked Moto2 Performance​


MotoGP 24 Moto2.jpg


Alongside the Riders Market feature, and AI-controlled riders now also receiving penalties and warnings from stewards, the riding performance of the Moto2 class is claimed to be changed based on real-world rider feedback.

According to Milestone, they will feel slightly more unstable at the beginning of the braking phase but also feature stronger engine braking. Once the brakes have been released, it is stated that Moto2s will be more manoeuvrable during fast changes of direction.

We will see for ourselves when the game releases across all major platforms on 2nd May 2024. Let us know in the comments below, or @OverTake_gg on X, if these are welcome changes.
About author
Thomas Harrison-Lord
A freelance sim racing, motorsport and automotive journalist. Credits include Autosport Magazine, Motorsport.com, RaceDepartment, OverTake, Traxion and TheSixthAxis.

Comments

I don't really care for any of the faff, I just want a bike game from Milestone where the front end doesn't feel like there's a cow with diarrhea spewing rivers of crud all over the track just in front of me. And where changes of direction are faster and don't make me think the bikes have an elephant attached to the rear. Also ineffective brakes where you need to start braking in a different country to actually stop the smegging bikes.
 
I don't really care for any of the faff, I just want a bike game from Milestone where the front end doesn't feel like there's a cow with diarrhea spewing rivers of crud all over the track just in front of me. And where changes of direction are faster and don't make me think the bikes have an elephant attached to the rear. Also ineffective brakes where you need to start braking in a different country to actually stop the smegging bikes.
Yeah those bikes sure are slow to turn. Way slower than real life.
 
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We can't really do comparisons with how the bikes turn to real life, because we don't have the inertia of the bike and the gyro effects to contend with, we can only compare to other games.


Historically Milestone always made the bikes have a lot of inertia, to avoid the weird fast looking movements that you can see in games going all the way back even to GP500.

So its definitely a choice, rather than something they think they have to fix.
 
We can't really do comparisons with how the bikes turn to real life, because we don't have the inertia of the bike and the gyro effects to contend with, we can only compare to other games.


Historically Milestone always made the bikes have a lot of inertia, to avoid the weird fast looking movements that you can see in games going all the way back even to GP500.

So its definitely a choice, rather than something they think they have to fix.
We can compare, I rode bikes for most of my youth (13 years). And Milestone get fundamental things wrong IMO. I'm only up to Ride 4 and MGP 21 so no idea if things have improved although what I've read about later MGP games leads me to think some things have got worse. But they take FAR too long to go from side to side. It also feels to me (common in all the Milsetone games I have Ride 1-4, MGP15, VRthe game, MGP21) is that it feel likes 75% of the cornering ability is all in the last 25% of lean angle, to get through the kink at VIR I have to put full lean angle on the controller and that is just not right, the lower angles of lean to very little steering, which means you have to get to the higher lean angles to have any sort of steering, which probably compounds the feeling of slow steering. GPBikes is FAR superior in that regard.

But the main thing they get wrong is brakes, I was on the Ego in Ride 4 and did a test from 39mph - 0 took about 3 seconds, that's ridiculous. That's how long it takes to stop a real bike going 60-70mph.
 
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